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OzDASL - Australasian Data and Story Library


Using the Library

OzDASL is a library of data sets and associated stories. It is intended as a resource for teachers of statistics in Australia and New Zealand and elsewhere. Emphasis is given to data sets with an Australasian context, although interesting data sets from anywhere in the world are included.

Data sets are grouped by the most obvious applicable methodology.  However these are not exclusive. For example, data sets with several variables can often be used for simple linear regression as well as for multiple regression, and almost any variable provides an example of a single sample.

Methods are listed from simple to advance, in much the same order as they would be introduced in a statistics course. Even within methods, data sets are listed in order of size and complexity, from simple to advanced.

You may browse for data sets under the following headings:

Alternatively you may use the StatWeb search page to search the data sets and stories by keywords or text. For example, seaching for "wallaby" will find the Growth of Tammar Wallabies data set.

Legend

Data sets may be marked with the following symbols:

au.gif (102 bytes)   Data or story has an Australasian context
remote.gif (316 bytes)   Data not stored here - outlink to another web site
private.gif (120 bytes)   Data not yet ready for public release
(n)   Number of variables in data set

Copyright

Permission is granted to freely use material on the OzDASL site, although acknowledgement of the OzDASL site as the data source would be appreciated. Please be aware though that some of the OzData data sets were originally published elsewhere; original sources are cited on the description page. If you intend to re-publish one of these data sets it may be necessary to obtain permission from the original copyright holder.

Citation

Please cite the library as:

Smyth, GK (2011). Australasian Data and Story Library (OzDASL). http://www.statsci.org/data.

Acknowledgements

OzDASL was partially funded by a Teaching Development Grant from the Teaching and Educational Development Institute, University of Queensland.

 


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