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About StatSci.org


What is it?

A window to statistical science and bioinformatics on the web, with special attention to Australia. StatSci.org consists of two parts: resources and directory. The resources are a set of services including the Australian jobs database. The directory is a Yahoo-like index of statistical science resources on the web.

What's New

The following pages have been created or updated in the last two weeks.

History

This site started life as a bookmark file. I posted it to the Web in August 1996 as a way of getting students started on the Web. I called it initially A Guide to the Web for Statisticians reflecting the idea that it included many resources which would be useful to statisticians even if not specifically aimed at statisticians. The site was renamed the Statistical Science Web in November 1999 with a refreshed hierarchical structure. Another major update was done to the site in December 2002.

The original concept was that the directory would not attempt to include a primary listing for every useful site but would link to key sites from which all other resources could be reached quickly. Unfortunately in some cases reliable key sites did not exist so original resources (Australian departments, Australian jobs, Australian conferences, the journal list, OzDASL and so on) were created where they did not previously exist. 

Credits

StatSci.org gratefully acknowledges funding from the Statistical Society of Australia Inc and infrastructure support from the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research. StatSci.org has been supported in the past by the University of Queensland Centre for Statistics and by a Teaching Development Grant from the University of Queensland Teaching and Educational Development Institute.

The Australian jobs database has been maintained over time by a team of individuals. From September to December 1997, the Australian jobs database was maintained by Michael Bulmer, a Lecturer in the Department of Mathematics at the University of Queensland. For the first quarter of 1998 we shared the workload. Many thanks to Michael. Since March 1998, the jobs site has been funded by the Statistical Society of Australia Inc. With this support, the jobs database has been maintained by Leslie Elliott (March to August 1998), Lucy Eager (August to November 1998), Tim Waterhouse (November 1998 to November 1999), Kerem Kozan (November 1999 to December 2000), Karyn Hamaty (December 2000 to December 2001), Matt Ritchie (January 2002 to July 2005), Mark Robinson (July 2005 to June 2007), Di Wu (July 2007 to December 2009), Belinda Phipson (January 2010 to December 2011) and Yunshun (Andy) Chen (from January 2012).

A Teaching Development Grant from the University of Queensland Teaching and Educational Development Institute allowed the creation of the OzDASL database of data sets with an Australian context for teachers of statistics. Steve Darlington, then a student in the UQ Department of Mathematics, helped install many of the data sets during 1998.

In April 1998 I wrote a new indexing search engine as a way of giving a much faster response and allowing more powerful search syntax such as phrase matching. The search syntax is based on AltaVista “simple search”. The program is written in Perl, and is a heavily re-written version of Xavatoria search engine. This replaced the original search mechanism, which dated from June 1997 and was based on a perl script written by Matt Wright.

From mid-1999 to early 2003, StatSci.org had a mirror site at the University of Southern Denmark. The webserver was provided there courtesy of the Department of Statistics and Demography.

In October 2001 the site moved to its own domain http://www.statsci.org and is hosted courtesy of the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research.

Where appropriate, this site makes use of QBullets, icons which indicate the function of a link. QBullets appear courtesy of Matterform Media. QBullets are freeware, copyright 1996 by Matterform Media. See the QBullet legend for the meanings of the QBullets.


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